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Nest

Discussion in 'Residential' started by kena, Dec 10, 2017.

  1. chucko615

    chucko615 Banned camp counselor

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    Michigan
    He meant Janitrol...................The first Goomans
     
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  2. kena

    kena New Member

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    Though I agree with most replies... I still have to deal with this stuff. Thanks for your input... this was more in line of what I thought I could do.
     
  3. Chuck

    Chuck SSP

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    Maybe. I also heard that it was some Apple engineers who started Nest. I think the seed money came from a dude named Coolperfect.
     
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  4. R2D2-TX

    R2D2-TX New Member

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    It was Doug Baldwin...
    Just saying...
     
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  5. pecmsg

    pecmsg Junior my ASS

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    Power steeling is fine in theory. Just doesn’t work in reality.
    24 volts to close
    14 volts to hold
    :dunno:
     
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  6. Chuck

    Chuck SSP

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    Why is it stupid to have a c terminal?
     
  7. R2D2-TX

    R2D2-TX New Member

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    If C is not required why have one?
    It will not work with common connected..
     
  8. HMD

    HMD does it matter?

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    here
    [​IMG]
     
  9. HMD

    HMD does it matter?

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    here
  10. jays 65

    jays 65 New Member

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    johny ringo co-enginered the nest just saying
     
  11. Jon

    Jon Team Canada

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    Canada eh!
    :lachen:
     
  12. crackertech

    crackertech assholiness *

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    Fl/IN/Ga/Ms/TX/NJ/VA/NC/TN

    :nono:
     
  13. Sdeery

    Sdeery Machinist in training

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    My favorite:
    [​IMG]
    sdeery
     
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  14. Chuck

    Chuck SSP

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    Because most circuit boards don’t like stealing power from w and g ...

    And yes, Nest works fine with a common wire
     
  15. R2D2-TX

    R2D2-TX New Member

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    Not the third generation Nest we have installed... but if it works for you... dilly dilly
     
  16. John Ringo

    John Ringo Whole Caf

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    I am a Nest Pro installer and also a Honeywell Pro installer. I have my opinions on both but they both make me money. I also have a 3rd gen Nest in my house and it works great. I don't beat my brains out on this kind of issue, If a product doesn't jive with the equipment and Pro tech support can't give me a reasonable fix (rare) I work toward getting them something better suited to their system. At the end of the day its just a controller with switches and its far less problematic than some high end building automation I have worked with.
     
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  17. mike1020

    mike1020 entitled millennial

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    Just rip out the nest and run a 20# main and be done with it
     
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  18. Jim54

    Jim54 New Member

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    278
    Location:
    Addison, Tx.
    I know nothing!


    The nest learning thermostat is a smart thermostat developed by Nest Labs and designed by Tony Fadell, Ben Filson, and Fred Bould.[1] The device is an electronic, programmable, and self-learning Wi-Fi-enabled thermostat that optimizes heating and cooling of homes and businesses to conserve energy.[2] It is based on a machine learning algorithm: for the first weeks users have to regulate the thermostat in order to provide the reference data set. Nest can then learn people's schedule, at which temperature they are used to and when.[3] Using built-in sensors and phones' locations it can shift into energy saving mode when it realizes nobody is at home.[4][5]

    (This paragraph from Wiki, everything else is from the Nest site)

    About the C wire

    The C wire doesn’t control heating or cooling. Instead, C wires deliver power from the system to the thermostat in case the other wires can’t provide enough power. Not all systems have a C wire installed, but Nest thermostats were engineered to use as little power as possible for their display and internal circuitry, so in the vast majority of cases, they don’t need a C wire. But if you find that you need a C wire with a Nest thermostat, you can contact a local Nest Pro installer to run one for you. Costs can vary depending on how difficult it is to route a new wire through your walls.

    When the Nest thermostat needs a common "C" wire
    Affected products: Nest Thermostat E, 3rd gen Nest Learning Thermostat, 2nd gen Nest Learning Thermostat, 1st gen Nest Learning Thermostat

    While we find that in the vast majority of homes the Nest thermostat can charge its built-in battery using the heating and cooling wires, there are a small number of heating and cooling systems and situations where the Nest Thermostat may require a common wire to bring power to the thermostat.

    What’s a common wire?

    A common wire is simply a low-voltage power wire to bring constant power from your heating and cooling equipment to the thermostat. Most common wires are blue or black, and you might have a common wire already.

    Your HVAC professional can install a common wire for you if you don't have one already.

    What are the symptoms of a situation where the Nest thermostat might require a common wire?

    For conventional heat-only systems:

    • Heat is always on or intermittently on when the Nest thermostat is not calling for heat (the Nest thermostat display background is black).
    • Heat is not on or intermittently turns off when the Nest thermostat calls for heat (the Nest thermostat display is active and the background is orange).
    • There is an unusual noise coming from the heating system.
    For conventional systems with cooling:

    • Cooling is always or intermittently on when the Nest thermostat is not calling for cooling (the Nest thermostat display background is black).
    • Cooling is not on or turns off intermittently when the Nest thermostat calls for cooling (but the Nest thermostat display is active and the background is blue).
    For heat pump systems:

    • Heating or cooling is always on or intermittently on when the Nest thermostat is not calling for it (the Nest thermostat display background is black).
    • Heating or cooling does not turn on or intermittently turns off when the Nest thermostat calls for it (the Nest thermostat display is active and the background is orange or blue respectively).
    What systems are known to need a common wire?

    • Many zone relay panels or control panels.
      The Nest thermostat requires a common wire to be compatible with many zone relay panels. Some systems have control panels or equipment interface modules that require a common wire to be compatible with the Nest thermostat. Here’s a list of known panels that require a common wire:
      • Honeywell AQ25110B
      • Honeywell EMM-3
      • Honeywell TZ-4
      • Honeywell HZ311
      • Bryant 548F036
      • White-Rogers 36C03-300
      • Carrier HK42FZ011
      • Nordyne 624631-A
      • Nordyne 903915A
    • Some gas valves.
      Some gas valves on systems vibrate or buzz when the Nest thermostat is installed. This can usually be fixed with a common wire.
    • Some micro-controller based systems.
      Systems that use micro-controllers instead of relays are sometimes more sensitive to power-sharing. If so, the Nest thermostat will need a common wire to be compatible with these systems.
    If you have questions about your installation and whether your home will need a common wire, please contact support using the information at the bottom of the page. We're here to help.

    Article Last Updated On: 08/30/2017

    I have zero experience with Nest stats. It does appear that they're here to stay because they're trendy. But they do have issues. And I want my professionally installed common wire!!
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2017
  19. Zman

    Zman Hanging by a Thread

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    Don't know about the Nest,but Those Heavy, Round ,Black/Chrome tstats with their off-white back-plates are a bad color scheme! And they suck! :D
     
  20. LemonWizard

    LemonWizard Blinky Lights Wizard

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    Location:
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    Their definition of common confuses me. When did common stop being the second leg of the xfmr circuit in this situation?
     
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